52e30d686f729.preview-620Baseball player Darryl Strawberry has had several run-ins with the law. On December 19, 1995, when he was playing for the New York Yankees, Strawberry was charged with failing to make child support payments. His trial was set for the following July, and he paid the child support with a bonus from signing to the Yankees.

On April 3, 1999, Strawberry was arrested for soliciting sex from a police officer working undercover as a prostitute. He was also charged with possession of a small amount of cocaine. On April 24, he was issued a 140-day suspension from Major League Baseball as a result. In May, he pleaded no contest and was sentenced to 21 months of probation, in addition to community service.

On September 11, 2000, Strawberry was driving to an appointment with his probation officer, while under the influence of painkillers. While driving, he caused a traffic accident and attempted to drive away. A police officer saw the incident and stopped Strawberry, arresting him at gunpoint. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to a year of probation and community service. Because the accident occurred when he was driving to see his probation officer, his probation was changed to house arrest.

On October 25, 2000, Strawberry left a drug treatment center that he was in and used drugs. This was a violation of both his parole and his house arrest. He was sentenced to 40 days in jail. On April 1, 2001, he was arrested once again for leaving his treatment center and house arrest, and was sentenced to more time in the treatment center.

On March 12, 2002, Strawberry was sent to jail after violating a number of non-drug related rules at his drug treatment center. He began to serve the 22-month prison sentence from 1999 that had been suspended. After serving 11 months, Strawberry was released on April 8, 2003.

In September 2005, he was arrested for filing a false police report, after claiming that his SUV was stolen. He was ultimately not arrested. Strawberry had also previously been arrested several times for domestic violence, though he was never issued any criminal charges. During the times of his arrests, he was undergoing treatment for colon cancer, and at several instances, showed signs of depression. It is possible that his criminal activity was a symptom of his depression and admitted loss of the will to live.


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